Whānau, Disability, and Whānau Ora Research #3

Māori & Psychology Research Unit

“Today Michael’s Mum came and her name is Bernie and we were talking about Michael to see how we could help him. We can play games with him and show him things to do with people and to respect Michael and teach him and we could have a running game or show him how to jump the tyres and Michael’s Mum brought some lamps to show us how they work and one was a touch lamp” (Wastney, Te Kooro-Baker & [ Continue Reading ]

Whānau, Disability, and Whānau Ora Research #2

Whāia Te Ao Mārama: Māori Disability Action Plan 2012 to 2017

A number of factors determine the outcomes for Maori disabled and their whanau. Some directly relate to how their needs are supported to participate in their own lives, communities and cultural worlds. This participation can shape their chances of attaining a quality of life that matches their aspirations (Ministry of Health, 2012, p. 1). Over 200 Māori participated in the consultation that led [ Continue Reading ]

Pimatisiwin: A Journal of Aboriginal and Indigenous Community Health

Pimatisiwin: A Journal of Aboriginal and Indigenous Community Health is an open access journal, meaning that it is publicly available on the internet. It is published by Native Counselling Services of Alberta, Canada, in collaboration with Te Rau Matatini here in Aotearoa; Papa Ola Lokahi in Hawaii, and the International Indigenous Council for Health Our Spirit Worldwide. The latest issue of [ Continue Reading ]

General Practices in Whānau Ora Collectives

General Practices in Whānau Ora Collectives

In February this year the Ministry of Health released its report on the performance of general practices in Whānau Ora collectives, as at September 2012. The results in the report are from the HealthStat software package that collects anonymised patient information summaries from general practices in Whānau Ora collectives. This is the first report of planned quarterly reports from the Ministry of [ Continue Reading ]

The Health of Māori Adults and Children

The Health of Māori Adults and Children

This paper presents key findings about the health and wellbeing of Māori adults and children in 2011/12, which come from the New Zealand Health Survey. In summary In 2011/12, almost all Māori children aged 0–14 years were in good health, according to their parents. More than four in five Māori adults aged 15 years and over reported being in good health. However, the survey results also [ Continue Reading ]

Whānau, Disability, and Whānau Ora Research

New Zealand Disability Strategy, ‘Making a world of difference – Whakanui Ōranga’.

Whānau, Disability, and Whānau Ora Research #1 Disability is not something individuals have. What individuals have are impairments… Disability is the process which happens when one group of people create barriers by designing a world only for their way of living, taking no account of the impairments other people have. (Ministry of Health (2001) New Zealand Disability Strategy, p.3) This is [ Continue Reading ]

Samoan Ways of Knowing

Clark Tuagalu

Epistemology is about the relationship between someone who seeks to know and what can be known. It is about how we come to have knowledge. According to Wilson (2008, p. 33) the epistemology question is, “How do I know what is real?” Very little published research exists on Samoan ways of knowing, which draws attention to the need to encourage more Samoan scholars to explore Samoan epistemology. [ Continue Reading ]

PATH planning tool for Whānau Ora research activities

path-drawing

Kia ora tātou! (Greetings one and all) My name is Kataraina Pipi, (Ngāti Porou/Ngāti Hine). I am the Co-Chair of the Tangata Whenua, Community & Voluntary Sector Research Centre, a self employed Facilitator, Researcher, Evaluator and Composer. I am involved in a range of evaluation work in the health and social services areas and also work as an Action Researcher alongside two Whānau Ora [ Continue Reading ]

Te Whetu Rēhua: a culturally based programme and evaluation framework

Te Whetu Rehua

Te Whetu Rēhua: a framework for defining as Māori participation in sport and recreation Te Whetu Rēhua is a culturally based programme and evaluation framework developed for He Oranga Poutama. Te Whetu Rēhua encapsulates a collective and shared understanding of five key Māori concepts and principles that make up what it means to participate as Māori in sport and recreation in the HOP programme [ Continue Reading ]