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Health

Kaupapa Māori and the PATH research tool in a post- colonial indigenous context

Jesse Pirini

Planning Alternative Tomorrows with Hope (PATH) is a visual facilitation tool that is used to make strategic plans with whānau and service providers throughout Aotearoa. In this project supported with funding by Nga Pae o Te Maramatanga we use a case study methodology to examine how effective the PATH process is in a Māori context, and if so what aspects

Navigators, Frameworks, Programmes, Whānau Hapu Iwi, Kaupapa Māori, Indigenous, Closing The Gaps
Kaupapa Māori Theory

Whānau Ora action research: Evidence of transformation following whānau planning and engagement.

TE PUNI KŌKIRI

Action research – as part of the wider measurement activity for the Whānau Ora approach – is focused on providing evidence of provider practice, developing improved whānau-centred service delivery and the impact on whānau. The key research question is ‘how could agencies and providers most usefully contribute to best outcomes for whānau?’

Navigators, Tamariki, Frameworks, Programmes, Policy, Whānau Hapu Iwi, Kaupapa Māori
Health

Tino Rangatiratanga: How Self-determination Can Heal a Broken Village

Barbara Gilbert

This is a powerpoint presentation and resource to understand the link between In-determination and self-determination, violence and abuse, and the breakdown and recovery of the whanau/family unit.

Navigators, Te Kaāwai Ora, Programmes, Policy, Kaupapa Māori
Health

Whānau Ora: What does it mean in practice?

Heather Gifford

Power point Presentation by Heather Gifford.  A power point explanation of  whanau ora.

Navigators, Frameworks, Policy
Public Health

Ka whānau mai te reo: Honouring Whānau, Upholding Reo Māori

Nicola Bright, Alex Barnes and Jessica Hutchings

This is the first report from a 3-year (2012–2015) kaupapa Māori research project that investigates how best to support the continuity of reo Māori development of whānau as they transition between kōhanga reo, kura kaupapa primary, wharekura, secondary and beyond. It aims to provide useful information about the reo Māori education options that are most likely to help whānau achieve

Whānau Hapu Iwi, Kaupapa Māori
Community Housing

E Rua Ngā Tūru – Attributing causation in Whānau Ora

Fiona Cram

This presentation explores how causal inferences can be drawn from a ‘natural experiment’, like Whānau Ora. I talk generally about health interventions and a little about the Whānau Ora initiative, and how we might evaluate the effectiveness of these interventions for Māori. I also talk about two chairs, to illustrate what a controlled experiment and what a natural experiment look

Frameworks, Whānau Hapu Iwi, Kaupapa Māori
Health

Report on the effectiveness of services delivered by DOVE Hawkes Bay Inc.

Penny Ehrhardt, Gaylene Little, Maryanne Marsters, Geoffrey Nauer, Mandy Pentecost, Ariana Stockdale-Frost and Judy Wivell

DOVE and EIT wanted to address this by examining the efficacy of family violence prevention services run for men, women and youth in Hawke’s Bay. In particular, we were interested in whether the services run by DOVE were resulting in long-lasting positive changes for individuals, families and whānau. You can find a copy of this report at: http://www.communityresearch.org.nz/news/the-effectiveness-of-family-violence-intervention-services-delivered-by-dove-hawkes-bay-inc-recently-added-to-our-kete-basket/

Programmes, Whānau Hapu Iwi
Health

Hauora Kotahitanga – Māori health experiences as models for co-operative co-existence between indigenous and non-indigenous people

Lisa Chant

This thesis examines the relationships forming between the worlds of Māori and non-Māori peoples through hauora Māori. The purpose of this study is to examine Māori experiences of the development and delivery of indigenous knowledge based hauora Maori models, and to consider these experiences conceptually as models for kotahitanga (co-operative co-existence) between indigenous and non-indigenous peoples.

Programmes, Policy
Public Health

Kei te pēwhea tō whānau? Exploring Whānau Well-being through the Māori Social Survey

Tibble, A & Ussher, S

Kei te pēwhea tō whānau? Exploring whānau using the Māori Social Survey describes how the Māori Social Survey 2013 (Te Kupenga) will study whānau and whānau well-being. This report explains the Māori-centred approach that Te Kupenga takes to understanding whānau and whānau well-being. We also provide a preview of this relatively new approach by presenting data on whānau and whānau

Policy, Whānau Hapu Iwi, Māuri Ora
Health

Developing a Kaupapa Māori Framework for Whānau Ora

Erena Kara, Veronique Gibbons, Jacquie Kidd, Rawiri Blundell, Kinigi Turner, Wayne Johnstone

Te Korowai has been developed from seven interconnecting themes raised by hui with kaumatua and represents the concepts and practicalities of Whānau ora. Te Korowai looks at the individual while also encompassing the collective of family and addresses the connectedness that goes beyond wider family structures to include health, education and social service providers.

Te Kaāwai Ora, Frameworks, Whānau Hapu Iwi, Kaupapa Māori, Indigenous, Māuri Ora
Health

Marae based Whānau Ora PATH Planning

Kataraina Pipi and Kim Whaanga-Kipa

A presentation by Kataraina Pipi and Kim Whaanga-Kipa about the marae based Whānau Ora PATH Planning

Whānau Hapu Iwi
Health

Tipping the balance: An analysis of the impact of the Working for Families Policy on Māori Whānau.

Dr Heather Gifford, Dr Amohia Boulton, Sue Triggs, Professor Chris Cunningham

NZ’s Working for Families (WFF) policy introduced in 2004 aimed to address, amongst other things, the poverty faced by low-income working families. While WFF has been evaluated, little evidence exists on its impact on Māori. Using data from the Best Outcomes for Māori: Te Hoe Nuku Roa Longitudinal Survey (THNR), we found that WFF has positively impacted income adequacy for

Programmes, Policy, Closing The Gaps
Education

Facilitating domestic violence programmes: Listening to voices from the field.

Dr Glenda Dixon and Dr Kay O’Connor

Relationship Services Whakawhanaungatanga (now Relationships Aotearoa) undertook an evaluation of 15 years of domestic violence programme facilitation. Ideas were gathered from experienced facilitators, client evaluation forms were analysed and Māori staff were consulted. Key findings included the centrality of facilitator-client relationship to programme effectiveness. Issues of power, gender and culture were explored with recommendations for programme training, facilitation and regulations.

Programmes, Policy
Health

Implementing Working for Families: the impact of the policy on selected Māori whānau

Dr Amohia Boulton, Dr Heather Gifford

This paper presents an analysis of the qualitative data collected for a study investigating the effect of the Working for Families policy on Māori families’ self-reported whānau ora (family wellbeing). Data are drawn from a discrete set of 30 qualitative interviews undertaken with Māori whānau involved in the Te Hoe Nuku Roa Longitudinal Study. Whānau perceptions about how the Working

Programmes, Policy
Health

Takitini: A collective approach to Whānau Ora action research

Nan Wehipeihana

Takitini: A collective approach to Whānau Ora action research presented at the Aotearoa New Zealand Evaluation Association Conference (anzea), Hamilton, 9 July 2012. This presentation reflects on the emergent ‘learnings’ of building a collective of 15 action researchers – the Takitini Collective – to undertake action research with Whānau Ora Provider Collectives

Navigators, Te Kaāwai Ora, Frameworks, Programmes, Policy, Whānau Hapu Iwi
Health

Kia Rite Kia Ora – Pilot Programme Evaluation What have we learned?

Kinnect Group

A powerpoint presentation on Kia Rite Kia Ora (2012) is a pilot whanau ora health intervention.  This powerpoint summarises some of the results.

Programmes, Policy
Health

Reducing Inequalities: Analysing the Effect of Government Policy on Whānau Ora

Dr H. Gifford and Dr A Boulton

The research discussed in this report to the Health Research Council (HRC) was commenced in February 2009 and completed in February 2012. Whakauae Research for Māori Health and Development (WRMHD) undertook the research in collaboration with the Research Centre for Māori Health and Development (Massey University).

Frameworks, Programmes, Policy, Closing The Gaps
Health

Making Work Pay: Policymakers Perspectives on ‘Working for Families’

Dr Amohia Boulton, Dr Heather Gifford

The paper focuses on preliminary analysis of the first set of data collected, namely key informant interviews conducted with policy makers involved in the development of the Working for Families (WFF) policy, exploring their understandings of the policy and its implementation. Four key themes, emerging from the key informant interview data, are presented for discussion: the context for, and background

Programmes, Policy
Public Health

Doing Action Research – Key learning and emerging principles CEDAR

Community Economic Development Action Research Project

In this paper we discuss our experiences in doing action research and share some methodological insights with other practitioners. The aim is to promote knowledge flows both within the public service and with the wider stakeholder community so as to contribute to a shared understanding about the use and value of using action research as a methodology.

Frameworks
Economic Development

Factors that help or hinder Community Economic Development.

Meenakshi Sankar and Karen Wong

The purpose of this paper is to look back over the three years of Community Economic Development Action Research (CEDAR) project and share some of the learnings with policy makers and with those engaged in community economic development work. The paper provides a summary of the issues emerging from CEDAR and offers valuable insights into factors that help/hinder communities in

Programmes, Policy, Closing The Gaps
Health

PATH Planning Tool – Presentation to the Whānau Ora Hui – Sharing the Learning

Kataraina Pipi and Mariao Hohaia (PATH Facilitators)

This presentation provides an overview of the PATH planning tool, its use in Aotearoa over the past ten years, with individuals, whānau, organisations and businesses. The current and potential use of the PATH planning tool in Whānau Ora is shared along with training opportunities that are available to become a PATH Facilitator.

Navigators, Programmes, Whānau Hapu Iwi
Public Health

He Kōrero Whānau o Te Rarawa

Wendy Henwood, Jasmine Pirini and Aroha Harris

He Kōrero Whānau is a component of a wider whānau and hapū development project within Te Rarawa, an iwi located in the Far North of Aotearoa. It aimed to prepare and support whānau and hapū to record their own histories, and in doing so to develop research methods and strategies to suit Te Rarawa purposes and realities. The innovation of

Frameworks, Whānau Hapu Iwi, Kaupapa Māori
Health

Innovation as Necessity: Te Rarawa and the Challenges of Multi-Purpose Research

Wendy Henwood, Aroha Harris

One of the major factors affecting not only iwi (tribal) research but also iwi development generally is compartmentalisation of – for example – funding, service provision, service and research contracts, government agencies and policy making.  This article shares some of the research stories and lessons arising from the integration of those individual projects into a single research programme – Ngā

Frameworks, Programmes, Policy, Whānau Hapu Iwi, Kaupapa Māori, Indigenous, Closing The Gaps
Education

TE PUNI KOKIRI Rangahau Tūkino Whānau – Māori research agenda on family violence

Te Puni Kōkiri

This research contributes to the Family Violence Mäori Research Agenda initiative. It identifies research priorities, gaps and potential areas of exploration. This study is part of a wider research project being undertaken by Te Puni Kökiri and other agencies to inform future investments in Mäori designed, developed and delivered initiatives

Programmes, Policy, Closing The Gaps
Public Health

Whānau Ora: Report of the Taskforce on Whānau-Centred Initiatives 2010

Taskforce

Details the whānau-centred framework developed by the Taskforce led by Mason Durie and including Rob Cooper, Di Grennell, Suzanne Snively and Nancy Tuaine.

Navigators, Te Kaāwai Ora, Frameworks, Policy, Whānau Hapu Iwi, Closing The Gaps
Research

‘Ma te Whānau te Huarahi Motuhake: Whānau participatory action research groups” in MAI REVIEW, Special Issue: Community Research Engagement

Moana Eruera

Whānau must lead their own development and solutions to work towards individual and collective whānau wellbeing for the future. Whānau are experts of their everyday lived experiences and hold the knowledge of their stories (past and present), aspirations, issues and complex dynamics that exist between whānau members and their extended and external relationships. This paper offers information and insights about

Navigators, Frameworks, Programmes
Research

Researching in Partnership: Utilising Fa’asamoa and Western Research Frameworks in Fieldwork in Aotearoa/ New Zealand 2003

Ieti Lima

Workshop powerpoint presentation on Researching in Partnership: Utilising Fa’asamoa and Western Research Frameworks in Fieldwork in Aotearoa/ New Zealand

Pasifika
Public Health

Talanoa Research Methodology: A developing position on Pacific research

Timote M. Waioleti

This paper contributes to the theorising on Pacific research approaches from a personal and Tongan perspective.

Pasifika, Navigators, Frameworks
Health

Fonofale – Model of Health 2001

Fuimaono Karl Pulotu-Endermann

This is a Pacific Island model of health for the use in the the New Zealand context.

Pasifika
Health

He Waka eke Noa – Health and Disability sector NGOs: Towards a whānau-centred approach 2010

Sharmaine Nolan

The Health and Disability sector NGOs working group identified the current and potential contribution of NGOs to Whānau Ora. This paper recognises that sector NGOs are already maximising their contribution to Whānau Ora, and that some of this work was in place before the initiative was introduced by government, however more needs to be done in ‘transforming’ to a whānau-centred

Programmes, Policy, Whānau Hapu Iwi
Public Health

Rangatahi Initiative: Process Evaluation

Roger Macky of Vertical Research

WCA hosts the Rangatahi Initiative which works in “hard to reach” whānau (mostly Black Power affiliated) with a focus on improving physical and emotional/mental health outcomes. It operates as a partnership with Wesley offering supportive infrastructure, supervision, and governance, while the Kaimahi have the credibility to work effectively from within. This research documents how the initiative operates and helps clarify

Rangatahi, Navigators, Programmes
Research

Te Kawai Toro – Report of analysis of expressions of interest 2006

Jennie Harre Hindmarsh

In 2006 the J R McKenzie Trust invited expressions of interest from Māori community organisations for grants supporting whānau development. This resulted in a large and diverse response. This document summarises the themes contained in those proposals, giving a snapshot of many aspirations around whānau development.

Health

Mahi Aroha: Māori Perspectives on Volunteering and Cultural Obligations

Joyce-Anne Raihania, Ann Walker

Volunteering for Māori is based on the notion of whanaungatanga (kinship) and the benefits derived from contributing to the common good. Within Māori culture, conceptions of self are linked to aspects of nature, wairua, mauri, whānau and mana, and all are intertwined.

Research

Te Rarawa Community Research

Te Rarawa Iwi Research and Development Group

This presentation to the 2010 Community Research Awards provides insight into the approach to community research by the Te Rarawa Iwi Research and Development Group (IRD), Te Runanga O Te Rarawa. The group was established to improve the management and control of research within our hapū communities, to ensure research aligned with the needs and aspirations of whānau, hapū and

Whānau Hapu Iwi
Public Health

The PATH Planning Tool and its Potential for Whānau Research

Kataraina Pipi

This paper outlines use of the PATH in Māori communities in Aotearoa New Zealand by Kataraina Pipi over the past eight years, including an examination of: • The foundations and principles upon which the PATH is based • The structured and systematic process used • The practical use of the PATH in various settings in Aotearoa • The PATH method’s

Navigators, Whānau Hapu Iwi, Kaupapa Māori
Community Housing

He Waka eke Noa – Health and Disability sector NGOs: Towards a whānau-centred approach

Sharmaine Nolan

This paper identifies the key strengths of the health and disability sector NGOs (non-government organisations) and the challenges and opportunities ahead for progressing towards a whānau-centred approach.

Navigators, Policy, Closing The Gaps
Public Health

Working with the families and children of prisoners in Aotearoa / New Zealand; A guide to effective practice to ensure good outcomes for the children

Lesley MacGibbon, Verna McFelin and Liz Gordon

An in-depth research programme undertaken by Pillars has found that the effects of imprisonment on the children are profound and long lasting. The purpose of this practice manual is to provide practical guidelines for supporting children in families or whānau where a parent is imprisoned. The manual is intended for use by individuals and agencies who work with families and

Navigators, Whānau Hapu Iwi
Public Health

Hei Tikitiki: Māori Rites of Passage & Youth Development

Manu Caddie & Michael Ross

Summarises interviews with Kaumātua/Kuia from different rohe about their experiences of the transition to adulthood. Included in the report is a literature review on the subject of rites of passage and youth development for indigenous peoples. The report identifies principles upon which traditional rites of passage have been based and suggests these may be adapted into contemporary contexts to promote

Whānau Hapu Iwi
Public Health

Whānau Ora & Action Research

Fiona Cram

Action Research is a participatory research method in which research is then undertaken to answer the question, with the findings reflected upon for their practice implications. Practice is then changed in response to the research findings and the resultant changes and the outcomes they produce are researched or evaluated. The philosophical underpinnings of Action Research align well with the principles

Frameworks
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