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Whānau Ora Navigators Initial Research for Te Putahitanga O Te Waipounamu

Whānau Ora Navigators work with whānau and families to identify their needs and aspirations, support their participation in core sectors such as housing, education, primary health and employment and link and coordinate access to specialist services. They have been identified as ‘key drivers’ in the Whānau Ora system (Gifford & Boulton, 2014). Most importantly, Navigators are instrumental in consolidating links

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Education

Nga Pakiaka Morehu o te Whānau

Dr Catherine Savage, Dr Anne Hynds, John Leonard, Letitia Goldsmith & Hēmi Te Hēmi

This initiative aimed to increase awareness amongst ahi kā whānau of their historical roles and responsibilities as kaitiaki, whilst at the same time contributing to whanaungatanga within Rangitāne whānau, hapū and iwi. Key project activities centred around a series of storytelling wānanga on various cultural and spiritual sites that are integral to Rangitāne identity. Resources developed through this initiative have

Whānau Hapu Iwi, Kaupapa Māori, Indigenous, Māuri Ora
Health

Capability Development Model

Helen Leahy

Te Taumata, the iwi representative board of Te Pūtahitanga mandated a capability development model of commissioning. This type of model closely aligns with Māori values whilst also being an economically efficient model, capable of generating long term transformative change with a lower investment than traditional service delivery. Capability development is preventative rather than service delivery which is reactive.

Rangatahi, Tamariki, Programmes, Whānau Hapu Iwi, Kaupapa Māori, Indigenous, Māuri Ora
Health

Kaupapa Māori and the PATH research tool in a post- colonial indigenous context

Jesse Pirini

Planning Alternative Tomorrows with Hope (PATH) is a visual facilitation tool that is used to make strategic plans with whānau and service providers throughout Aotearoa. In this project supported with funding by Nga Pae o Te Maramatanga we use a case study methodology to examine how effective the PATH process is in a Māori context, and if so what aspects

Navigators, Frameworks, Programmes, Whānau Hapu Iwi, Kaupapa Māori, Indigenous, Closing The Gaps
Kaupapa Māori Theory

Whānau Ora action research: Evidence of transformation following whānau planning and engagement.

TE PUNI KŌKIRI

Action research – as part of the wider measurement activity for the Whānau Ora approach – is focused on providing evidence of provider practice, developing improved whānau-centred service delivery and the impact on whānau. The key research question is ‘how could agencies and providers most usefully contribute to best outcomes for whānau?’

Navigators, Tamariki, Frameworks, Programmes, Policy, Whānau Hapu Iwi, Kaupapa Māori
Health

Tino Rangatiratanga: How Self-determination Can Heal a Broken Village

Barbara Gilbert

This is a powerpoint presentation and resource to understand the link between In-determination and self-determination, violence and abuse, and the breakdown and recovery of the whanau/family unit.

Navigators, Te Kaāwai Ora, Programmes, Policy, Kaupapa Māori
Public Health

Ka whānau mai te reo: Honouring Whānau, Upholding Reo Māori

Nicola Bright, Alex Barnes and Jessica Hutchings

This is the first report from a 3-year (2012–2015) kaupapa Māori research project that investigates how best to support the continuity of reo Māori development of whānau as they transition between kōhanga reo, kura kaupapa primary, wharekura, secondary and beyond. It aims to provide useful information about the reo Māori education options that are most likely to help whānau achieve

Whānau Hapu Iwi, Kaupapa Māori
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