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Kaupapa Māori and the PATH research tool in a post- colonial indigenous context

Planning Alternative Tomorrows with Hope (PATH) is a visual facilitation tool that is used to make strategic plans with whānau and service providers throughout Aotearoa. In this project supported with funding by Nga Pae o Te Maramatanga we use a case study methodology to examine how effective the PATH process is in a Māori context, and if so what aspects

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Public Health

Ka whānau mai te reo: Honouring Whānau, Upholding Reo Māori

Nicola Bright, Alex Barnes and Jessica Hutchings

This is the first report from a 3-year (2012–2015) kaupapa Māori research project that investigates how best to support the continuity of reo Māori development of whānau as they transition between kōhanga reo, kura kaupapa primary, wharekura, secondary and beyond. It aims to provide useful information about the reo Māori education options that are most likely to help whānau achieve

Whānau Hapu Iwi, Kaupapa Māori
Public Health

He Kōrero Whānau o Te Rarawa

Wendy Henwood, Jasmine Pirini and Aroha Harris

He Kōrero Whānau is a component of a wider whānau and hapū development project within Te Rarawa, an iwi located in the Far North of Aotearoa. It aimed to prepare and support whānau and hapū to record their own histories, and in doing so to develop research methods and strategies to suit Te Rarawa purposes and realities. The innovation of

Frameworks, Whānau Hapu Iwi, Kaupapa Māori
Health

Innovation as Necessity: Te Rarawa and the Challenges of Multi-Purpose Research

Wendy Henwood, Aroha Harris

One of the major factors affecting not only iwi (tribal) research but also iwi development generally is compartmentalisation of – for example – funding, service provision, service and research contracts, government agencies and policy making.  This article shares some of the research stories and lessons arising from the integration of those individual projects into a single research programme – Ngā

Frameworks, Programmes, Policy, Whānau Hapu Iwi, Kaupapa Māori, Indigenous, Closing The Gaps
Public Health

Hei Tikitiki: Māori Rites of Passage & Youth Development

Manu Caddie & Michael Ross

Summarises interviews with Kaumātua/Kuia from different rohe about their experiences of the transition to adulthood. Included in the report is a literature review on the subject of rites of passage and youth development for indigenous peoples. The report identifies principles upon which traditional rites of passage have been based and suggests these may be adapted into contemporary contexts to promote

Whānau Hapu Iwi
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