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Whānau Ora action research: Evidence of transformation following whānau planning and engagement.

Action research – as part of the wider measurement activity for the Whānau Ora approach – is focused on providing evidence of provider practice, developing improved whānau-centred service delivery and the impact on whānau. The key research question is ‘how could agencies and providers most usefully contribute to best outcomes for whānau?’

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Health

Tino Rangatiratanga: How Self-determination Can Heal a Broken Village

Barbara Gilbert

This is a powerpoint presentation and resource to understand the link between In-determination and self-determination, violence and abuse, and the breakdown and recovery of the whanau/family unit.

Navigators, Te Kaāwai Ora, Programmes, Policy, Kaupapa Māori
Health

Whānau Ora: What does it mean in practice?

Heather Gifford

Power point Presentation by Heather Gifford.  A power point explanation of  whanau ora.

Navigators, Frameworks, Policy
Health

Hauora Kotahitanga – Māori health experiences as models for co-operative co-existence between indigenous and non-indigenous people

Lisa Chant

This thesis examines the relationships forming between the worlds of Māori and non-Māori peoples through hauora Māori. The purpose of this study is to examine Māori experiences of the development and delivery of indigenous knowledge based hauora Maori models, and to consider these experiences conceptually as models for kotahitanga (co-operative co-existence) between indigenous and non-indigenous peoples.

Programmes, Policy
Public Health

Kei te pēwhea tō whānau? Exploring Whānau Well-being through the Māori Social Survey

Tibble, A & Ussher, S

Kei te pēwhea tō whānau? Exploring whānau using the Māori Social Survey describes how the Māori Social Survey 2013 (Te Kupenga) will study whānau and whānau well-being. This report explains the Māori-centred approach that Te Kupenga takes to understanding whānau and whānau well-being. We also provide a preview of this relatively new approach by presenting data on whānau and whānau

Policy, Whānau Hapu Iwi, Māuri Ora
Health

Tipping the balance: An analysis of the impact of the Working for Families Policy on Māori Whānau.

Dr Heather Gifford, Dr Amohia Boulton, Sue Triggs, Professor Chris Cunningham

NZ’s Working for Families (WFF) policy introduced in 2004 aimed to address, amongst other things, the poverty faced by low-income working families. While WFF has been evaluated, little evidence exists on its impact on Māori. Using data from the Best Outcomes for Māori: Te Hoe Nuku Roa Longitudinal Survey (THNR), we found that WFF has positively impacted income adequacy for

Programmes, Policy, Closing The Gaps
Education

Facilitating domestic violence programmes: Listening to voices from the field.

Dr Glenda Dixon and Dr Kay O’Connor

Relationship Services Whakawhanaungatanga (now Relationships Aotearoa) undertook an evaluation of 15 years of domestic violence programme facilitation. Ideas were gathered from experienced facilitators, client evaluation forms were analysed and Māori staff were consulted. Key findings included the centrality of facilitator-client relationship to programme effectiveness. Issues of power, gender and culture were explored with recommendations for programme training, facilitation and regulations.

Programmes, Policy
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